“Moonflowers” Now Available in Illuminations

If he could plant flowers on the moon for her, he would—lilacs in craters’ shadows, roses in grayscale cracks, and daisies (among her favorites) facing the long, rough edge fading into space, their yellows and oranges spiraling in front of endless black; and if he could spell her name on that same surface, he would and would time the sun’s passing that brightens the petals-as-letters like fiery birds flocking for a moment before scattering again. But he rolls over, sniffles, glances at the plastic and papier mâché spaceships that he built and strung over his bed alongside aluminum foil-ball planets that he painted.

“Moonflowers,” William Auten, Illuminations 35, summer 2020

“Moonflowers” is now available in Illuminations 35, summer 2020.

Thank you to Simon Lewis, staff, and College of Charleston’s Department of English—and thank you for reading.

ORDER NOW In Another Sun

ORDER NOW: In Another Sun, the second novel from William Auten and Tortoise Books, available May 26

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“Many and Many a Year Ago” Now Available

“Many and Many a Year Ago,” the winner of the 2019 Norton Girault Literary Prize in Fiction from Barely South Review (Old Dominion University), is now available in the Fall 2019 (11.1) issue online, for purchase on Amazon, and for my family and friends back in Virginia, may be in select bookshops. Congrats to fellow contributors and thanks to BSR staff and judge Janet Peery, who said

This is a smart, demanding, tautly-written, risk-taking puzzle of a story that amounts to no less than an Industrial Age creation myth, specifically the creation of the narrator. It bears the mark of family lore, a story told and retold over time. On first reading, the marvel is that the second person narrator works so beautifully, and on first reading the payoff is emotional. On second reading the story delivers its thematic riches, the seemingly random occurrences, the misapprehensions, and plain luck coming together as surely as chromosomes and alleles come together to make a new person in the world.

2019 Norton Girault Literary Prize in Fiction

“Many and Many a Year Ago” has won the 2019 Norton Girault Literary Prize in Fiction from Barely South Review (Old Dominion University); the fall 2019 issue will feature the short story. Many thanks to BSR staff and judge Janet Peery, who said

This is a smart, demanding, tautly-written, risk-taking puzzle of a story that amounts to no less than an Industrial Age creation myth, specifically the creation of the narrator. It bears the mark of family lore, a story told and retold over time. On first reading, the marvel is that the second person narrator works so beautifully, and on first reading the payoff is emotional. On second reading the story delivers its thematic riches, the seemingly random occurrences, the misapprehensions, and plain luck coming together as surely as chromosomes and alleles come together to make a new person in the world.

“FOMO” Now Available at The McNeese Review

Today at ten in the morning, Mr. Snickerdoodle isn’t having much to do with the scenery and the commotion and the crew and the props passing back and forth in front of him so many times that neither his tawny eyes nor his tufted ears can keep up with electrified people and things scurrying to and from various places, at least not where he sits, stressed out, having plopped himself on his rear end in a kind of protest, tail convulsing, dropping down onto the dusty floor, the smoke-black tip never touching the ground, tail sharply rising again in a spasm whenever voices shout or wheels squeak or metal clanks metal or another backdrop painted like an evening rattles by.

“FOMO” is now available at Boudin, the online home of The McNeese Review. A heartfelt thanks to Chris Lowe and the MR staff for finding a home for this story.